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The 9 Confidence Types that will change the way you see people

Ability Confidence Types

incisive
self-assured
over-confident
analytical-v2
pragmatic
instinctive
over-analytical
cautious
apprehensive

The 9 Confidence Types include people who are predisposed to overconfident or underconfident decision making. Knowing a person’s Confidence Type can help organizations build stronger teams and derive more value from their leadership and development programs.

Overconfident

Over Confidence

Overconfident

They have supreme confidence in their abilities, a strong ‘can do’ attitude and the tendency to act first and ask questions later. Because they highly overestimate their true abilities, they don’t appreciate the risks in their decisions or anticipate any problems.

How they see themselves:

  • Quick to embrace new ideas and innovations
  • Ready to change gears, take action and make decisions

How others may see them:

  • Impulsive, quick to act and overestimate capabilities
  • Poorly planned and organized
self-assured-2

Self Assured

Self Assured

They have a high level of confidence in their abilities and typically approach situations with an optimistic, ‘can do’ attitude. While capable and typically good front-runners, they are not immune to overconfident decision making.

How they see themselves:

  • Confident in taking on new tasks and responsibilities
  • Upbeat, positive and undeterred by setbacks or failures

How others may see them:

  • Enthusiastic and persistent in the face of challenges
  • Willing to take action at the expense of thorough analysis
incisive

Incisive

Incisive

They have high ability matched by high levels of confidence in their ability. They are very competent decision makers who make accurate judgements, are self-assured, self directed, perceptive and astute. They have strong leadership potential.

How they see themselves:

  • Smart, insightful and quick-witted
  • Assured, definite and decisive

How others may see them:

  • Assertive, certain and forceful
  • Strategic, shrewd and astute
spontaneous-2

Spontaneous

Instinctive

They are inclined to skim across the details of situations without reflecting too deeply on their thinking and problem solving. They show tendencies towards overconfident decision making in not always seeking advice and clarification on issues.

How they see themselves:

  • Active and enthusiastic in contributing ideas and effort
  • Willing to make decisions and take a chance

How others may see them:

  • Overestimates capabilities and knowledge
  • Impulsive and careless about details and plans
pragmatic-2

Pragmatic

Pragmatic

They are balanced decision makers who generally understand when they have the knowledge to make a good judgement and when they do not. They can act independently, while also recognizing when to seek input and advice from others.

How they see themselves:

  • Practical, reliable, capable and confident
  • Open to advice and input from others.

How others may see them:

  • Competent, deliberate and dependable
  • Responsive to advice, instruction and training
analytical

Analytical

Analytical

They are highly capable problem solvers but they are inclined to check and recheck their thinking before making decisions. They tend not to trust their initial judgements and it is highly unlikley they will rush important decisions.

How they see themselves:

  • Measured, strategic and rational
  • Reflective, thoughtful and precise

How others may see them:

  • Risk averse, logical and cautious
  • Systematic and methodical
non-committal-2

Unassured

Apprehensive

They have relatively low confidence, particularly when faced with situations and problems that are outside the bounds of their knowledge and experience. They are unlikely to be venturesome in making decisions and may often defer to others.

How they see themselves:

  • Comfortable with existing knowledge, tasks and routines
  • Seek advice and do not rush into action

How others may see them:

  • Reliant on others to set direction, and content to follow
  • Indecisive, doubtful and unassertive
cautious-2

Cautious

Cautious

They approach new situations with caution and restraint because of leanings towards underconfident decision making. They seek confirmation from others before making decisions and taking action, rather than trusting their own judgement.

How they see themselves:

  • Capable, systematic, planned and rational
  • Risk averse, steady and careful

How others may see them:

  • Underestimate true level of abilities and skills
  • Lacking in confidence and defer to others in decision making
over-analytical-2

Over Analytical

Over Analytical

They have relatively low levels of confidence, and show strong tendencies towards underconfident decision making. While highly capable in terms of problem solving, self doubt may sometimes lead to procrastination and avoidance of risk.

How they see themselves:

  • Analytical, thorough and precise
  • Detail-minded, deep thinking and reflective

How others may see them:

  • Capable, systematic and well-reasoned
  • Self-doubtful and not realizing full potential

NEW FRONTIERS

The science of Confidence Types centers on the measurement of Cognitive Confidence – a new factor that is related to both our ability and personality. Importantly, our Cognitive Confidence has “top down” influence on our decision making.

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